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CHAPTER XXVII.

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES ó BRISTOL.

SAMUEL APPLETON, manufacturer, Bristol, was born in Leicester, England, May 22, 1831. He came to America in 1850, landed at New York, and engaged as a workman in a factory at Germantown. In 1853 he began the manufacture of woolen goods at Palethorp and Oxford streets, Philadelphia, in a factory thirty by sixteen feet. In 1856 Mr. Appleton became general manager for Schofield & Branson, in Philadelphia. In 1866 he returned to Palethorp and Oxford and built the present Phoenix mills there. He removed to Bristol in 1873 and became manager of the Bristol woolen mills, then owned by Thomas Hugh & Co. In 1879 the construction of the Providence hosiery mill was begun by Mrs. Clara Appleton, who married the subject of this sketch in 1865. The factory first built was sixteen by thirty feet; this has been enlarged with the growth of the business until at present the plant is valued at $76,000. About two hundred operatives are employed, while the annual product aggregates several hundred thousand dozens of hose of every description.

CHARLES S. BAILEY, retired, P.O. Bristol, was born in this township July 27, 1820. He is a son of William and Harriet (Stackhouse) Bailey, both natives of Bucks county and of German and English origin. The father was a carpenter and had nine children. Charles S., the oldest, was reared in Bensalem and received his education in the public schools of that township. He learned the carpenterís trade early in life, but never made it his permanent occupation. He has been engaged in various lines of business and has met with financial success. In 1846 he was married to Elizabeth, daughter of James Stewart. She is of Irish origin. They have five children now living: Anna, wife of John G. Warwick; Ellen, Harriet, Margaret, wife of Charles H. Bunting, and Charles S., Jr. Mr. Bailey is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church, and has been trustee and treasurer. In politics he is a republican. He served ten years as justice of the peace, was collector of school taxes twelve years, and assessor seven years.

CHARLES BAKER, farmer, P.O. Newportville, was born at Newportville August 21, 1850, and is a son of Edward and Caroline (Roberts) Baker, natives of Bucks county and of English and German origin. His father was a carpenter and bridge-builder in early life, but was subsequently a lumber-dealer and run a saw-mill in Newportville. In later life he was a farmer. He died in 1886. He was the father of fourteen children, eleven of whom grew to maturity. Charles was the sixth and grew to manhood in Newportville, where he attended the common schools. He first worked with his father in the saw-mill and also worked at the carpenterís trade in Bristol for two years. He has been farming since 1880. In 1870 he married Anna, daughter of Egbert and Parmelia Street. She is of English origin. They are the parents of six children: Walter, Willie, Carrie, Cora, Charles, and Emma. Mr. Baker is administrator of his fatherís estate. In a financial point of view he has been successful. He is a republican.

JOHN T. BAKER, farmer, P.O. Bristol, was born at Newportville, February 21, 1863, being a son of Edward and Caroline (Roberts) Baker, natives of Pennsylvania, and of English and German origin. Edward Baker died here in 1886, being then in his 69th year. His family consisted of fourteen children, eleven of whom grew to maturity. John is the youngest and was reared in Bristol township, attending school here. He chose farming as a business, and is now the owner of the homestead farm. He is a republican in politics, as was also his father. His father was a prominent and successful business man. In early life he engaged in the lumber and saw-mill business at Newportville. In latter life he engaged in farming and succeeded in accumulating a handsome fortune, which he left to his children. The administrators of the estate were John T. and his brother Charles.

WILLIAM B. BAKER, M.D., dentist, P.O. Bristol, is a prominent dental practitioner, having his office and residence in Radcliffe street, in this borough. He was born in Bristol township July 21, 1820, and is a son of Thomas and Maria (Birkey) Baker, the former born in Freemansburg, of German origin, and the latter in Burlington, N.J., of Swiss descent. They had thirteen children, ten of whom lived to grow up, of whom our subject was the third, and the oldest now living. He attended school in his native township, and chose medicine as his profession, graduating from the Philadelphia medical college with the degree of M.D. in 1844. He had also studied dentistry, which he practised before his graduation, and preferring it, gave up his regular practice except as he had occasion to use his knowledge in the practice of dentistry, where it has been of great value to him. He knows that, to be a successful dentist, a thorough knowledge of anatomy and medicine is requisite, and his success proves him eminently qualified in both. He has practised in Bristol since 1848 with marked success. In 1845 he was married in Bristol to Anne E., daughter of William Fenton, of this county, where she was born. They have two children living: Mary C., and Henry H., who is an engineer on a Delaware river boat. Dr. Baker was postmaster of Bristol for eight years, and for ten years served as school-director. He and his wife are members of the Episcopal church, of which he is a vestryman; he is likewise a Royal Arch Mason. In politics he is a republican.

THOMAS BARNARD, merchant, P.O. Bristol, son of Thomas and Rebecca (Eastman) Barnard, was born in New Hampshire, June 14, 1831. His grandparents came from England to New Hampshire, where his parents were born. His father and grandfather were farmers. Thomas, our subject, was the seventh child in a family of eight children. He was reared on the farm and received a common school education. Early in life he learned the tinsmithís trade, and was in the tin and stove business in New York city ten years. In 1875 he came to Bristol and established himself in the same business, to which he has since added coal and wood. He was first married in 1871. His wife died in 1876, and in 1883 he married his present wife. They are members of the Presbyterian church. Mr. Barnard is a democrat, an Odd Fellow, and a Knight of Pythias. Hon. Daniel Barnard, a prominent attorney of New Hampshire, and several terms a state senator, is a brother of our subject.

W.J.A. BIRKEY, M.D., surgeon dentist, Newportville, Bucks county, was born in Burlington county, N.J., March 25, 1804, and is a son of John Birkey, who was a hatter by occupation and carried on his trade and owned the hotel at Newportville, Bristol township. Peter Birkey, the grandfather of W.J.A., was a quartermaster in General Washingtonís army during the revolutionary war and a pioneer of Bucks county. The family are of English origin. Dr. Birkey received a medical diploma from Spain, but made dentistry his profession and practised in Philadelphia for fifty years. He stood at the head of his profession and is now living a retired life. He has three sons, all of whom are graduates of medicine. Two of them practised dentistry in Philadelphia. William J.A., Jr., was one of the pioneers to California in 1851. Isaac M. Birkey acted as a medical officer of the army during the war, and is a Knight Templar in Masonry. Dr. W.J.A. Birkey has been an active and influential member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and has held high offices in that organization, having travelled and organized lodges; also of the Free Masons, Druids, etc. He has been a prominent politician and was president of the convention which nominated General Zachary Taylor for president. His other son, Henry W. Birkey, entered the United States service at the commencement of the war and served until its close in the regular navy. He was twice honorably mentioned to the department for volunteering to go into battle at Mobile and for attending the yellow fever cases during the epidemic at New Orleans. He has one son, John Washington Birkey.

WILLIAM BLACKWOOD, proprietor of bakery, P.O. Bristol, was born in the borough of Bristol, February 16, 1845. He is a son of Philip and Mary (Wright) Blackwood, the former a native of New Jersey, the latter born in Bucks county and both of English origin. Philip Blackwood was a wheelwright. He had six children. Our subject, the fifth child, received a common school education and learned the bakerís trade. He carried on a bakery in Philadelphia three years, then came to Bristol, where he has since been in the same business. His store is a three-story brick building on the main street of Bristol. He is also quite extensively engaged in the ice business and has recently built three ice-houses. His success in business is entirely due to his industry and ability. He is a man of undoubted integrity and is greatly esteemed in the community. In politics he is a republican. He is a director of the Cemetery Association and treasurer of the Bristol Building Association, and a member of the I.O.O.F.

JACOB W. BOWMAN, the senior member of the firm of Myers & Bowman, seed-growers, P.O. Bristol, was born in Bristol township, December 10, 1849, and is a son of William and Eliza (Shinkle) Bowman. His parents were natives of Pennsylvania and of German origin. His father is a farmer and now living a retired life in Bristol township, being 83 years of age. He has been twice married, his wives being sisters. Jacob is the youngest of seven children, and was reared on the farm, attending the district school at Newportville. He served two years at the harness-makerís trade, and first engaged in business in 1881, as a commission merchant in Philadelphia. In 1883 he embarked in his present business in company with James L. Myers. They cultivate fifty acres of land, all in garden seed, and are making a success of the business. They attend to the business themselves, both being industrious men, and press their work with a determination to succeed. They sell all wholesale. Mr. Bowman was married in 1877 to Sally, daughter of Charles and Mary (Book) Myers. She was born in Philadelphia and is of German origin.

JOHN S. BRELSFORD, deceased, carpenter and undertaker, P.O. Bristol, was born in Burlington, N.J., a son of William Brelsford. His father was twice married. He had five children by his first marriage, and two by the second, of whom John S. was the youngest. His mother died when he was only ten years old. His parents were of Scotch origin, and early in life instilled into him habits of industry, which have proved a powerful factor in his financial success. At the age of ten years he started to learn the shoemakerís trade, but discontinued after one year, and returned to Bristol. At the age of fifteen he learned the carpenterís trade in Bristol, and worked at journey-work a short time, after which he went into business for himself. In 1842 he added undertaking to his business, and met with success in both. He was essentially a self-made man, having attended school but one winter in his life. In 1848 he married Sarah Helling. She died in 1853, leaving two children, Joseph and Rachel. In 1855 he married Mary, daughter of William Ward, of Bristol. Their children are: Joseph, Elwood, William, and Loring. Mr. Brelsford was a member of the Methodist Episcopal church. He was Sabbath school superintendent for twenty years, and class-leader for thirty years. He was school-director and member of the town council, and belonged to the Knights of Pythias and the Odd Fellows of Bristol. May 15, 1887, he died of paralysis, after an illness of ten days.

AMOS BRIGGS, attorney and ex-judge, residence 1303 North Broad street, Philadelphia, is a native of Bucks county and was born in Pennís Manor, January 22, 1825. His early life was spent on a farm in Pennís Manor and attending school. At the age of 19 he began teaching in Tullytown, Falls township, where he taught for two and a half years, when he came to Philadelphia and began reading law in the office of William R. Dickerson in August, 1846. He remained there thirteen months, when he left and was registered with the late Theodore Cuyler, with whom he finished his studies, and on his motion was admitted to practise at the bar of the Philadelphia courts in November, 1848. He continued in active practice until 1872, when he was elected judge of the District Court of Philadelphia. He remained on the Bench until January, 1883, since which time he has been actively engaged in the practice of his profession in the city of Philadelphia. In October, 1863, he was elected a member of the city council, but as it interfered with his business he resigned nine months later. The Judge is a self-educated and a self-made man, and is a natural student. By his own exertions he obtained an education equal to a collegiate course. He is the oldest son and second child of John and Sarah (White) Briggs, who had two sons and two daughters. Three are living: our subject; Benjamin, a successful farmer of Pennís Manor; and Sarah Ann, widow of John Hawke, residing in Bristol. Judge Briggs married Miss Joanna Cheston, October 15, 1846. She was born in Falls township, Bucks county, and was a daughter of Thomas and Mary (Lovett) Cheston. She was the mother of four children: Mary L., who died at the age of sixteen; John; Anna, wife of William C. Newport, of Willow Grove, Pa.; Frank, an attorney in Philadelphia. The mother died in November, 1863. Judge Briggs married Mrs. Eliza Cheston in March, 1865. She was born in Bristol township, Bucks county, and is a daughter of Amaziah and Susan Headley. No children have been born to this marriage. The Judge is a member of Lodge No. 3, A.Y.N., of Philadelphia. He stands high in the estimation of the citizens of Bucks county and of Philadelphia. He is of English and German descent on the paternal side. His grandfather, Amos Briggs, was born in New Jersey, and was of English descent. His maternal grandfather was of English descent and a native of Pennsylvania.

MOSES BROWN, deceased, was born in Boston, Mass., in 1826. Both his paternal and maternal ancestors were among the early English settlers in America. He was the only child of Moses Brown, who was a merchant. Our subject was reared in Boston, where he received his education, and early in life embarked in the mercantile trade, first as a salesman, then as a merchant. He subsequently engaged in the wholesale boot and shoe trade in New York city, and during his life succeeded in accumulating a handsome fortune. He retired from business in 1866, and bought the property in Bristol on the banks of the Delaware river, where he died December 3, 1876. In 1847 he was married in Philadelphia to Miss Anna M., daughter of John Seisser, who was a merchant. Her parents were of German origin. Mr. and Mrs. Brown had two children: Helen Collins, deceased, and Mortimer Harris, now an attorney in Philadelphia. Mr. and Mrs. Brown are members of the Episcopal church.

J. MERRICK BROWN, passenger agent, P.O. Bristol, was born in Bristol, April 1, 1827, and is a son of John T. and Susanna (Fouzer) Brown, natives of Bucks county. His father was a prominent man and served as deputy sheriff of this county at one time. He was agent for the Camden and Amboy railroad and steamboat line. He died in 1849, aged fifty years. He had nine children, of whom J. Merrick was the third. He was reared in Bristol, receiving his education in the public schools. He has been agent for the Camden & Amboy and Pennsylvania railroad company since 1847, and is one of the oldest agents in the companyís employ. He learned telegraphy, and was manager of the Western Union Telegraph company here from 1861 to 1882. He is also express agent and served all this while as passenger agent. In 1849 he married Sarah Stocks. They are the parents of four children: Clara, wife of G.W. Waite, train-master on the Pennsylvania railroad; Anna A., died January 22, 1886; Mattie S. and Lizzie G. Mr. and Mrs. Brown are members of the M.E. church, and he has been superintendent of the Sabbath school for twenty-four years. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity and the I.O.O.F. In politics he is a republican.

JAMES MADISON BRUDON, retired merchant, P.O. Bristol, was born in the borough of Bristol, March 4, 1805. His grandfather, Captain Joseph Brudon, was a native of Ireland, where he was married. He came to Philadelphia prior to the revolution, and was one of the first to volunteer his services on the side of the patriots. He was one of the twenty picked volunteers who formed the advance of the forlorn hope as it was called. Of these twenty, seventeen were either killed or wounded. Mr. Brudon was wounded in the jaw by a bullet. He was elected captain and crossed the Delaware with Washington on the memorable night of the 25th of December, 1776. He lost an eye at Trenton, and was shot in the leg at Princeton. He drew a pension until his death, and also received a land grant in Ohio. He was a very large man and stood six feet two inches in his stockings. He died in Bristol at a ripe old age. He and his wife, Bridget, were members of the Episcopal church. They had five sons and two daughters: Mary, who married Enos Wright; William, who married Elizabeth Van Hart, and was a farmer in Falls township, and died at the age of 95; John, who married a Miss Latt, and was a farmer of Bristol; Joseph; Thomas, who was a cooper and died unmarried; James, also a cooper, married a widow Winner; and Richard, a tailor and a bachelor. Joseph Brudon was born in Bristol, August 15, 1776, and died July 29, 1854. He was married to Hannah Gosline, born in Bristol, March 24, 1782, and died April 7, 1868. He learned the cooperís trade, which he followed a number of years. He was in the war of 1812, was a great temperance man, and a member of the Methodist Episcopal church over fifty years. His wife was also a member of this church. She was a daughter of Richard and Rachel (Greene) Gosline, the latter a niece of General Greene, of the revolutionary war. Richard Gosline was a property owner in Bristol. He was imprisoned at Philadelphia while the English were in possession of the city. Richard and Hannah Brudon had six sons and four daughters: Mary, married Euclidus Stackhouse, November 20, 1827; James, married Sarah Osmond, November 20, 1828; Ann, married John Saudy, March 1, 1832; Joanna Painter, married Jonathan Milnor, February 14, 1839; Charles Tompkins, married Mary Ann Cook, December 26, 1841; Elizabeth, married John Fisher; and John, who married Henrietta Appleton. James Brudon, the second child and oldest son of Joseph, was educated in Bristol, learned the cooperís trade with his father, and was in partnership with him. He married twice. His first wife was Sarah Osborne, to whom he was married November 20, 1828. She was born in Bristol, April 14, 1808, and was a daughter of Joseph and Hannah (Lott) Osborne. She died December 26, 1860. She was the mother of six sons and four daughters: Mary A., wife of John Adams; Edward C. married Caroline Patterson; Joseph married Susannah Gordon; James Madison died unmarried; John Wesley died in infancy; William and Sarah, twins (William married twice, Rebecca Hibbs and Lydia Newton; Sarah married Charles Wollard); Lizzie L. married T. Watson Bewley, April 7, 1869. They had three children: Mattie T., James, and Eddie B. Charles F. married Mary E. Jones, March 22, 1871. They have two children: Tillie and May Belle; Hannah O. married John Force. James M. Brudon married for his second wife, Maria T. Bewley, February 11, 1863. She was born near Newtown, Bucks county, and was a daughter of Charles and Rebecca (Hellings) Bewley. The result of this marriage was two children who died in infancy. Mrs. Brudon died April 16, 1884. James Brudon engaged in the mercantile business in 1836, and retired in 1854, since which time he has been engaged in erecting buildings and looking after his property. He has been chief burgess of Bristol two terms, and has been a member of the council thirty years. He has the confidence and respect of all who know him. He is now in his 82d year, and enjoys good health. In politics he is a democrat. He has twenty grandchildren and eleven great-grandchildren.

EDWARD C. BRUDON, collector and agent of the Lehigh Coal and Navigation Company, P.O. Bristol, was born in Bristol, January 21, 1832, and is the oldest son of James and Sarah (Osmond) Brudon, of Bristol. He was educated in the Bristol schools, and at the age of sixteen apprenticed to the carpenter and joinerís trade, and continued to follow his trade until 1859, when he became associated with what is now the Lehigh Coal and Navigation Company. He was married at Bristol, December 22, 1853, to Miss Caroline Patterson. She was born in Bristol, and was a daughter of Robert Patterson and Ann Eliza West, natives of Bristol. The former was collector for the canal company for a number of years. Mr. and Mrs. Brudon had four children: Ann Eliza, wife of Frank R. Rue, a farmer of Bristol township; Sallie died at the age of 18 years; Robert P., dealer in lamp oils, etc., Bristol; and Carrie, who resides at home with her parents. Mr. Brudon is a member of the Hopkins Lodge, No. 87, I.O.O.F., of Bristol. He has held the office of school-director three years, and has refused other positions of trust. In politics he is a democrat.

ANTHONY BURTON was one of the first settlers of what is now Bucks county (then called Buckingham) in Pennsylvania. He emigrated from England. The exact date of his arrival is not known. He was settled, however, and possessed of considerable property previous to 1684. In Phineas Pembertonís book of cattle marks of that date his mark is there described and recorded. He also owned slaves. March 16, 1695, he and one Thomas Burk purchased from Peter White and others a tract of land covering the present site of Bristol. They laid it out in town lots and called it New Bristol, and he, with other lot-owners, in 1720 petitioned for and procured letters patent from Governor Keith for the incorporation of Bristol, which continued its charter down to the Revolution. In 1715 he was commissioned a justice of the peace, and held that office for several years. He was a man of liberal education and great influence in the community. He belonged to the established church and gave the land for the church and church-yard of St. James Episcopal church, at Bristol, and also contributed to the erection of a church building which was completed in 1712. It appears from the records that he and any of his lineal descendants are entitled to the occupancy of two pews in the church forever. On the 18th day of December, 1687, he married Sarah Gibbs, widow; she died June 28, 1718, without issue. July 28, 1720, he married Susan Keene, by whom he had two children: Martha, who died unmarried, and Anthony, Jr., born July 17, 1721. Anthony Burton died in 1739, and was buried in St. James churchyard at Bristol.

Anthony, Jr., son of Anthony and Susan, married Mary Hough, daughter of Richard Hough, February 12, 1752. He was a large land-owner and resided on his estate on the old road about midway between Bristol and the falls of the Delaware, in what is now Bristol township. The father of his wife was an eminent Friend and the daughter was a member of meeting. It was supposed her husband adopted her religious views, as it does not appear that he attended at Bristol church after his marriage. All his children became Friends. He had eight children, of whom four died in infancy and four survived him: John, born September 17, 1753; Martha, born July 25, 1756; Anthony, born August 9, 1758; and Jonathan, born August 21, 1765. John, the oldest son of Anthony, Jr., and Mary, married Rachel Wilson (nťe Satcher), widow of Henry Wilson, in February, 1778. He resided on the homestead of his father in Bristol township the most of his life and afterward removed to Falls township. He had two children by his wife Rachel: Joseph and John. She died in 1781. October 9, 1789, he married Hannah Watson, and by her had the following children: Benjamin, Mary, Rachel, Anthony, and Charles. He died September 3, 1835, and was buried at Fallsington. Anthony, son of Anthony, Jr., and Mary, married Jane, daughter of Dr. John Gregg, of New Jersey, April 27, 1781. Their children were John G., Amos, Deborah, and William. He died in April, 1838, and was buried at Fallsington. Jonathan, son of Anthony, Jr., and Mary, married Letitia Williamson, on the 11th of March, 1790, and had children: William, Sarah, Mary, Peter, Ann L., and Elizabeth. He died in 1840 and was buried at Falisington. The descendants of these three children of Anthony, Jr., and Mary have become related by marriage to the Houghs, Watsons, Williamsons, Wilsons, Carlisles, LaRues, Headleys, Paxsons, Mitchells, Thompsons, Stackhouses, and Cadwalladers, nearly all of the old families in the lower part of the county. Being Friends they eschewed politics, although always having a decided, political faith. They were generally agriculturists, some of them occupying land owned by the first Anthony.

Joseph, the grandson of Anthony, Jr., was a large land-owner in Bristol and Falls townships and was a justice of the peace for over thirty years. He married Sarah Watson and died in 1858. Anthony, also a grandson of Anthony, Jr., was nominally a farmer, though he engaged in many other business enterprises. He married Mary Headley, and after her death Anna Paxson. He died in 1874. He was a devoted and prominent member of the Society of Friends, a man of unblemished reputation and great ability. For twenty-four years he was president of the Farmersí National Bank of Bucks County. He was also president of the Delaware River Steamboat Company, and filled many other positions of trust and usefulness. In the various public positions to which he was called his ability and worth were highly appreciated, and he enjoyed to the fullest extent the esteem and confidence of the entire community. In his social intercourse he was kindly and frank and always ready to encourage those in adverse circumstances. All efforts made for the advancement of society received his quiet aid. He was industrious and frugal, yet generous. In his death the community lost a valuable citizen and a wise counsellor. His son, Elwood, is a successful merchant of Tullytown. William, also a grandson of Anthony, Jr., was a merchant in Philadelphia, and afterward a doctor of medicine. He was remarkable for his brilliant conversational powers and the extent and variety of his information. He married Susan Hallowell, of Philadelphia, and died at Pennís Manor.

Jonathan, a grandson of Jonathan and great-grandson of Anthony, Jr., was a large manufacturer of iron and died in Ohio a few years since very wealthy. William, another great-grandson, was a successful merchant in New York. One of his sons is now in the U.S. navy, and another was killed in the late war. John A., a great-grandson of John, son of Anthony, Jr., is a lawyer of high standing at the Philadelphia bar. He married the daughter of Dr. William S. Van Horn, who was a surgeon of eminence in the U.S. navy. John H., a great-grandson of Anthony, son of Anthony, Jr., was a member of the state legislature in 1878.

JOHN BURTON, farmer, P.O. Tullytown, was born August 3, 1829, at Tullytown, Pa., and is a son of Anthony Burton and Mary Headley. His early life was spent on the farm and he was for a short time engaged in the mercantile business. At the breaking out of the rebellion, he enlisted as a private in the Anderson cavalry. He participated in 18 engagements and was mustered out as lieutenant. He was married February 7, 1867, to Elizabeth Headley, daughter of Edward and Eliza Headley. Their children are: Franklin, born February 27, 1868; Elwood, born August 2, 1870; Horace H., born March 30, 1877; and A. Russell, born July 17, 1881. Among the many positions of public trust and honor held by Mr. Burton may be mentioned: director of the Farmersí National Bank of Bucks county, of the Bristol Improvement Company, of the Delaware River Steamboat & Transportation Company, of the Cape May and Delaware Bay Navigation Company, and treasurer of the William Penn Mutual Loan and Building Association. In politics he is a republican, and is a member of the Society of Friends.

HON. JOHN H. BURTON, farmer and stock-grower, P.O. Emilie, was born on the farm where he now resides November 22, 1830, and is a son of John G. and Rebecca (Brooks) Burton. The former was born in Bucks county, Pa., and the latter in Chester county. They were of English origin and were descendants of Friends, and among the early settlers of Bucks county. In early life his father was a carpenter, but in later life engaged in farming. He died in 1868 and his wife in 1859. They had ten children, all of whom grew to middle age, seven of them being still living. Their names are as follows: Deborah, Lydia, Amos, Jane, Hannah, Margaret, Anthony, John, Anna Eliza, and Henry A. John H. was reared on the farm, receiving his education in the common schools, and chose farming as a business. In early life he taught school and subsequently went to Ohio, Indiana, and Illinois, remaining for five years in the west. He then went to Virginia and taught school for one year, after which he went to the Adirondack mountains in New York and was engaged in the lumber trade for five years. In 1861 he enlisted in the 93d N.Y. volunteer infantry in Co. D, and served three years as private, sergeant and lieutenant. He then went to the northern neck of Virginia and engaged in the lumber trade, and in 1868 returned to Bristol, and has farmed here since. In 1878 he was elected to the legislature from Bucks county and served one term. He is a member of the G.A.R., and belongs to the Society of Friends.

JOSEPH BURTON, deceased, was born in Bristol in the house in which his daughter now resides, and which has been occupied by five generations of Burtons. The pioneer of the Burton family was Anthony Burton, who came from England about 1660, and first settled where Bristol now stands. To him belongs the honor of giving Bristol its present name. He was an Episcopalian, but married a member of the Society of Friends. His family consisted of six sons and one daughter. The sons were members of the Society of Friends, while the daughter held to her fatherís faith. Therefore those that bear the name of Burton are mostly members of the Society of Friends. The family are among the influential and thrifty families of this county. Joseph Burton was born in 1779, being a son of John and Rachael (Satcher) Burton. He was the oldest of a family of seven children. He was reared on the farm, attended the common schools and made farming the business of his life. He died in 1858. He married Sarah Watson, who was born in New Jersey in 1772. She was of English origin and a member of the Society of Friends. She died in 1859. They were the parents of six daughters and one son: Ann, Rachel, Sarah, Joseph, Mary W., Martha, and Rebecca W., all members ofí the Society of Friends. Joseph Burton was a republican and was justice of the peace for forty years. Financially he was successful, and at the time of his death was the owner of 281 acres of valuable land.

JOSEPH BURTON, farmer, P.O. Bristol, is prominent among the descendants of the early pioneers of Bucks county. The family of which he is descended came from England to Bucks county at a very early date. Joseph Burton was born on the farm where he now resides in 1848, and is a son of John C. and Sarah (Headley) Burton, natives of Bucks county. His maternal ancestors were also among the early emigrants from England to America. His father was a farmer and had three children, Joseph being the youngest. He was reared on the farm, attended the district school, and has been a tiller of the soil all his life. He is also engaged in the dairy business. He was married in 1870 to Miss Anna E., daughter of William G. and Elizabeth C. Allen, and granddaughter of William Allen, whose family came from England. They have two children, Joseph Allen and Russell Wilson. Mr. Burton is a republican in politics. He has been a school director and is a member of the I.O.O.F.

JOHN W. CLOSSON, deceased, who was county coroner of Bucks county, and for fifteen years proprietor of the Closson House, Bristol, was a man of more than ordinary intelligence and ability. He was born near Point Pleasant, Tinicum township, June 16, 1839, being a son of George W. and Charlotte (Wyker) Closson. They were natives of Bucks county. "Obituary: George W. Closson, an old and well-known resident of Bucks county, died at his residence on the Delaware, below Point Pleasant, in Plumstead township, on Tuesday last, aged over seventy-two years. For several years his health and faculties had been giving way, and for some time previous to his death be was in quite a weak condition. Mr. Closson was extensively known as a business man and politician. About thirty years ago he was elected county treasurer, holding the office for two years, which was the term then prescribed. It was during his term that the tenure of office of the treasurer was limited to one year, by an act of the legislature, in consequence of the great number of candidates, who could not otherwise be so well accommodated. Mr. Closson made a good officer, and in his transactions at the Doylestown Bank made the acquaintance of Abraham Chapman, then its president. At the request of Mr. Chapman he bought a few shares of stock in the bank and became one of its directors. He occupied that position for nearly or quite twenty years. He was supervisor of the Delaware Canal for many years, while it was the property of the State, receiving his appointment from the board of canal commissioners. As a politician Mr. Closson was an active democrat, and was always interested in party affairs, though not generally bitter in his feelings. On Friday his remains were interred in the Doylestown cemetery, the funeral being attended by many friends and relations, and the members of the masonic lodge at Doylestown, to which he. belonged." He was a son of William and Sarah Closson. Mrs. George W. Closson was born September 16, 1803, and is still living. She was a daughter of Henry and Mary Wyker. Mr. and Mrs. George W. Closson had three sons and four daughters. John W., our subject, was the fifth child. He was educated at Point Pleasant. He clerked in stores for his father and brother until the outbreaking of the late war. Mr. Closson was one of the gallant young men of Bucks county who joined the Doylestown Guards April, 1861, and hurried to the defence of the flag. Mr. Closson returned home, was mustered out and soon after was engaged in the mercantile business for himself at Point Pleasant. November 16, 1865, he married Miss Mary Leslie, a daughter of James and Mary (Boyle) Leslie, natives of Ireland, where they were married. They first settled in Mauch Chunk, Carbon county, Pa., afterward in Bristol. After Mr. and Mrs. John W. Closson were married they moved to the "Exchange Hotel" in Bristol, which Mr. Closson purchased in 1872 of his father-in-law, James Leslie, and in 1875 remodelled, and which has since been the Closson House. In 1872 he was elected coroner, and by a special act of the legislature he was empowered to appoint deputies throughout the county of Bucks, and served six years, when his health failing him, he gave up political life and turned his attention to his hotel, where he died November 8, 1882. Mrs. Closson took charge of the hotel at once, and being a lady of excellent mind and business talent, she has by hard work and good management made her house one of the most popular in the state. Owing to the increase in trade, she has erected a fine three-story brick building with pressed brick front and all the most modern improvements. The chambers of the Closson House are spacious, handsomely furnished, well ventilated and comfortable. The parlors and reception rooms are attractive and elegant. Mrs. Closson possesses every possible qualification for the position she fills with so much womanly grace and dignity. During her management of the Closson house she has maintained the high reputation it has always held, and makes it a home for all who seek rest or refreshment beneath its quiet roof.

RICHARD CORSON, farmer and builder, P.O. Bristol, was born in this county, September 16, 1816. His parents were Amos and Martha (Martindale) Corson, of French and English descent. Amos Corson was a farmer and had nine children, five of whom lived to maturity. Richard was educated in the district school and chose farming as his occupation. He followed this business exclusively until 1863, when he bought sixty-five acres of land in the borough of Bristol. On this land, which has mostly been laid out in town lots, he has erected a large number of houses. He has eight in course of erection at the present time, and has done much to improve the town. He is a republican. In 1871 he was married to Mary, daughter of Isaac Willard. They have one child, Mabel. Mrs. Corson is a member of the Presbyterian church.

ELLWOOD DORON, coal and lumber-dealer, P.O. Bristol, is of German extraction, and is a son of John and Catharine (Lamb) Doron, both of whom were natives of this state. His father was a miller. He had ten children, of whom Ellwood was the oldest son. Our subject was born in Frankford (now a part of Philadelphia) on March 5, 1827, and lived in Montgomery county until he was 21 years old. He was educated in the common schools, and his father dying when he was 17 years old, he learned the trade Of a miller, which he followed for four years in Montgomery county. He then went to Ohio, but subsequently returned and followed his trade in Bucks county for twenty-two years. He worked in Bristol for Dorrance & Knight one year and afterward engaged in butchering for five years, at the end of which time he formed a partnership with John Dorrance. After his partners death he carried on the mill business alone until 1870, when he bought a property on Radcliffe street, and established his present business, in which he has been successful. In 1851 he was married to Elizabeth Hellings, who died in 1872. They had eight children, but two of whom are living: William E., who is married and has two children, and Kate, who lives with her father. Mr. Doron served as burgess of Bristol for four years. He belongs to the masonic fraternity, Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and Knights of Pythias, and is a man of undoubted integrity.

JAMES DRURY, editor and postmaster, P.O. Bristol, is a native of Chester county, and was born March 2, 1848. He is a son of John and Mary C. (White-man) Drury, and is the oldest of a family of eight children. He was reared in Bucks county, where he attended the common schools, and early in life learned the trade of a printer at Phoenixville and Doylestown. In 1871 he came to Bristol and established the "Observer," which he still conducts. In 1885 he was appointed postmaster of Bristol. In 1871 he was married to Miss Etta Slack, a native of this county. They have two children: Eva R. and Morris D. Mrs. Drury is a member ofí the Methodist Episcopal church. In politics Mr. Drury is a democrat.

DAVID EVERITT, retired farmer, P.O. Emilie, was born Middletown township, Bucks county, in 1804, and is a son of Aaron and Mary (Hellings) Everitt, who were of Dutch origin. His father was a farmer and tanner, and had a family of seven children, of whom David was the youngest. He was reared in Middletown township, attending the subscription schools, and chose farming as his business, which has been his main occupation through his life. His wife was Miss Letitia White. Of their nine children seven are now living: Theodore, a merchant in Illinois; Elizabeth E., who was the wife of Joseph E. Allen (deceased); Matilda E., married George W. Allen (deceased); Mary Ellen, wife of Samuel W. Headley; Aaron Huston (deceased); David, a merchant in Illinois; Julia (deceased); Anna Maria, wife of William Hibbs; and Aldridge, a farmer. Mr. Everitt is a democrat, and has been tax-collector and school-director in Bristol township.

A. WEIR GILKESON, attorney, P.O. Bristol, was born in Bristol, October 29, 1853, and is a son of A.W. and Margaret M. Gilkeson. His father, who is deceased, was for many years a prominent attorney in Bristol. A. Weir is the youngest of a family of four children, and was reared in Bristol. He was educated at the Episcopal academy, in Philadelphia, and at St. Stephenís college, Annandale, N.Y., from which he graduated in 1873. He studied law with his brother, B.F. Gilkeson, in Bristol, and was admitted to the bar of Bucks county in 1879, when he opened an office in Bristol and has since practised there. He is also engaged in real estate, surveying, and fire insurance, his business being distinctively everything in connection with real estate. He is regarded as a successful business man. He is prominent in building association matters, being secretary of the "Bristol," "Fidelity," and "Union" associations of Bristol, is a well-known member of the Building Association League of Pennsylvania, and one of the editors of "The American Building Association News," a monthly journal, published in Chicago. He is treasurer of the public library of Bristol and official surveyor of Bristol borough. In 1882 he married Mary E., daughter of Rev. Dr. Fairbairn, president of St. Stephenís college. She is of Scotch origin. They have one child, Alice. Mr. and Mrs. Gilkeson are members of the Episcopal church.

B.F. GILKESON, attorney, P.O. Bristol, was born in Bristol August 23, 1842. The father of this gentleman was Andrew W. Gilkeson, whose ancestors were among the first settlers of the state, as were also those of his mother, who was a Miss Kinsey. The father was born in Montgomery county, but spent most of his life in Bucks. He practised law in Bristol for many years, and served one term as prothonotary of Bucks county. Our subject was educated in the graded schools and at the Hartsville academy, and studied law with Anthony Swain, Esq., of Bristol. He began the practice of his profession in February, 1864, and is now accounted among the leading attorneys of the county. In 1870 he was married to Charlotte B., daughter of George B. Jones, of Pittsburgh, Pa., who died in 1872, and in 1874 Mr. Gilkeson was married to Helen E., daughter of Samuel Pike, of Bristol. They have three children: Franklin, Helen,. and Ethel. Mr. Gilkeson was a member of the state militia during the war. He is district deputy grand-master of Masons for Bucks and Montgomery counties, and a trustee of the state lunatic asylum at Norristown, Pa., and has been corporation counsel for the borough of Bristol for many years. He is a member of the Episcopal church; and his wife of the Presbyterian church. In politics he is a republican.

SAMUEL GOSLIN, dealer in agricultural implements, P.O. Newportville, was born in Newportville, Pa., January 4, 1821, and is a son of John and Martha (Randall) Goslin, natives of Bucks county, and of English descent. His father was a blacksmith in Newportville for many years. Samuel is the sixth in a family of four sons and three daughters. He was reared in the town where he spent almost his entire life, and attended the subscription school. He learned the wheelwrightís trade, and was engaged in wagon-making in Newportville until 1852, when he embarked in his present business. In 1842 he married Jane, a daughter of Amos and Elizabeth (Thornton) Addis, of Bucks county, and of German descent. Their children now living are: Edward H., Ellwood, Sally, and Harry. Mrs. Goslin is a member of the Episcopal church. Mr. Goslin is a republican politically. His son, Ellwood, is now a partner with him in business. He was born in Bucks county, and was married in 1871 to Miss Lina G., daughter of William and Elizabeth (Pickering) Pearce, the latter a native of Philadelphia, and the former of New York State, and of English origin. They have two children, Jennie and Elizabeth. He is a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and a republican politically.

WILLIAM H. GRUDY, manufacturer, P.O. Bristol, was born in Philadelphia in December, 1836. He is a son of Edmund and Rebecca (Hume) Grudy, the former born in England, and the latter in Hulmeville, this county. The father was a merchant in Philadelphia, and had four children. William H., the second child, attended select school, was a clerk in early life, and afterward in mercantile trade for himself in Philadelphia. In 1877 he began the manufacture of worsted yarn at Bristol, where he has been uniformly successful. He has done much to add to the prosperity of the borough. In politics he is a republican, and is burgess of Bristol borough. He is a member of the Masonic order. He was married in 1861 to Mary R. Ridgeway. Their children are: Joseph R., clerk in his fatherís office, and Meta R., at home.

AMOS B. HEADLEY, farmer, P.O. Tullytown, is among the descendants of the early pioneers of Bucks county. He was born in Bristol township March 30, 1842, and is a son of Thomas and Elizabeth (Brown) Headley, who were natives of Pennsylvania, and of English origin. His father was a miller by occupation. He built and owned a large saw-mill and was engaged in the lumber business in Bristol township many years. This mill was destroyed by fire and never rebuilt. He at the same time owned the mill now owned by Amos B., which the latter bought in 1868. Thomas Headley is retired from active labor and lives in Bristol borough. Amos B. was the third in a family of four children. He was reared on the farm, attending the public schools at the same time, and also attended college at Poughkeepsie, N.Y. Early in life he worked with his father in the mill, and his first business was that of a merchant miller, combined with that of a saw-mill, which occupied him from 1865 to 1880, since which time he has been engaged in farming. He owns a neat and substantial residence in Tullytown, where he resides. He was married December 10, 1868, to Miss Emma T., daughter of Isaac and Sarah Ann (Hendrickson) Ivins. Her parents were of English origin, and now reside in Bristol borough, her father having retired from business. The union of Mr. and Mrs. Headley has been blessed with two children, Irene and Edith. They attend the Friendsí meeting. In politics Mr. Headly is a republican. He once served as jury commissioner of Bucks county.

JESSE S. HESTON, a native of Upper Makefield, Bucks county, was a merchant for many years at Newtown, and also largely engaged in the development of coal lands in Pennsylvania. In 1866 he removed to Bristol, where he died April 16, 1879, aged 80 years, and was regretted by all who knew him. He was a friend of the poor, a rare business man, and possessed of fine mental abilities. His wife, Martha (Thomas) Heston, who was a native of Philadelphia, is still living, at an advanced age. Their family consisted of three children: George T., who is a prominent physician at Newtown; William Ellwood, and Joseph T., who were engaged in business with their father, and are now residing with their mother at Bristol. They are all republicans politically.

ANDREW J. HIBBS, retired merchant, P.O. Bristol, was born at Newportville, Bucks county, June 1, 1829, and is a son of Mahlon and Margaret (Brodnax) Hibbs, the latter a daughter of Robert Brodnax. His ancestors were among the earliest settlers of Pennsylvania. Mahlon Hibbs was a mason in early life, but abandoned it, and kept a hotel at Newportville for twenty years. He subsequently moved to Bristol, and was toll-keeper on the canal until he retired, a few years before his death, which occurred in 1876, when he was 79 years old. His wife died in 1854. She was a member of the Episcopal church. They had nine children: John G. (deceased); Robert B., a farmer in Bristol township; Angeline, a widow; A.J. and Julia, twins, the latter a widow residing in Philadelphia; William Henry, residing in Bristol; Mary E., who married Wm. B. Wright, and resides in Doylestown; and two children who died in infancy. Andrew J. Hibbs was reared in Bucks county, receiving a common school education, and early in life clerked in a store. In 1850 he embarked in the mercantile business in Bristol, and was actively engaged in business for twenty-seven years, when he retired. July 8, 1852, he was married in Philadelphia to Christine G., daughter of Elijah Thorp, of Bucks county. Mr. Hibbs is a democrat, and has often been a delegate to county and state conventions. He was a delegate to the Chicago convention that nominated Cleveland for president in 1884.

ROBERT B. HIBBS, farmer, P.O. Bristol, was born in Bristol township, January 20, 1820, and is a son of Mahlon and Margaret (Brodnax) Hibbs, natives of Pennsylvania, and of English origin. His father was a mason by trade, his family consisting of five children. Robert B. is the second, and was reared on the farm, attending the common schools at Hulmeville in Bucks county. He chose farming as the business of his life, in which he has met with success. His financial success is due to his industry, economy, and determination to succeed. He is the owner of a well-improved farm of 145 acres. He was married in 1844 to Sarah B. Hutchinson. Their children are: Charles Willis, who is married, and engaged in farming; and Evaline W., wife of William Milner, also a farmer. Mrs. Hibbs is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church.

CHARLES T. IREDELL, cashier of the Farmersí National Bank of Bucks county, was born in Montgomery county, Pa., September 11, 1805. He was the son of Joseph and Hannah (Thomas) Iredell, both of whom were natives of this state. The Iredells came from England about 1700, and the Thomas family, who were of Welsh extraction, were among the early settlers of the state. His parents moved to Philadelphia during his early boyhood, where his father was a merchant, and where he received his education. He worked in a drug-store till 1827, when he entered the bank at Bristol, in which institution he was employed for over fifty-five years.

His strict integrity, clear business insight, and energy were known and fully appreciated by the many who came into business relations with him. He was actively engaged in the duties of the bank until within six weeks of his death, which occurred June 16, 1882. The officers of the bank unanimously passed resolutions expressive of their high appreciation of his services; of their sorrow at his decease; and of sympathy for his bereaved family. He left his widow and family in comfortable circumstances. They occupy the fine home in Bristol, adjoining which they have seventy-seven acres of very valuable land. Mr. Iredell was an elder and treasurer of the Bristol meeting of the Society of Friends, to which society his ancestors, on both sides, for many generations, belonged. He was also treasurer of several building associations. He was married October 8, 1829, to Rebecca, daughter of Samuel and Abigail (Howell) Newbold, who was a native of Delaware. Their children are: Hannah A., Louisa, Samuel N., Abbie N., Mary H., Charles, Susan T., Bessie N., living, and Joseph and Rachel, deceased. All are members of the Society of Friends, and all highly respected. Three are married, and the others live with their mother.

WILLIAM E. JEFFRIES, merchant, P.O. Bristol, was born in Philadelphia July 9, 1820. His parents, Robert and Isabella (Edgar) Jeffries, were of English origin and were born in Pennsylvania. Robert Jeffries was a seafaring man. He had three sons and two daughters. William E., the oldest son, received his education in the public schools of Philadelphia and learned the ropemakerís trade, which he followed for over twenty-five years. He came to Bristol in 1848 and engaged in manufacturing until the breaking out of the war. In 1861 he enlisted under the gallant Colonel Baker. He was afterward transferred to the 69th regiment. Soon after the battle of Petersburg he was promoted sergeant. In 1866 he was married in Philadelphia to Phebe Haines, who was born in Germany. They have four children: Andrew, Anna, John, and Edward. Mr. Jeffries embarked in his present business in 1883. He is a member of the republican party.

B.S. JOHNSON, merchant, P.O. Bristol, was born in Bristol July 12, 1862, and is a son of Samuel and Margaret (Lyle) Johnson, natives of Ireland. B.S. is the sixth in a family of seven children. He was reared in Bristol, where he received his education. He first was clerk in a store, and subsequently entered the employment of the Pennsylvania railroad as a brakeman. He was also baggage-master and served two years as conductor on a Pullman car. In 1883 he and his elder brother, John L., established the present business, the firm name being John L. & B.S. Johnson. They deal in ready-made clothing. The firm have the confidence of their customers, and their business and stock are constantly increasing. Mr. Johnson is prudent and industrious, and has made his own way in the world. The present business is a successful one. He is a democrat politically.

JAMES F. KING, farmer, P.O. Bristol, was born in Bristol township February 20, 1853, and is a son of James C. and Elizabeth (Headley) King of English origin. His maternal ancestors were among the early settlers of Bucks county. James C. King came from England when a boy. Our subjectís great-grandfather, Joshua Wright, was taken prisoner in Bristol by the British during the revolutionary war. The family have usually been tillers of the soil. James C. King, father of James F., was a school-teacher in early life, but later on followed farming. His family consisted of nine children, seven of whom are now living. James F. is the youngest and was reared on a farm in Bristol township, where he also attended school. He wisely chose the occupation of farming, being also engaged in the milk business, to which he has devoted considerable time. He is now the owner of a well-improved farm, where he resides. He was united in marriage in 1878 to Sarah Woodman, daughter of Benjamin and Ellen (Ewer) Woodman, natives of this county. Her parents were of English and Welsh origin. This union has been blessed with three children: Florence, Frank, and Mary. In politics Mr. King is a republican.

S.H. KING, farmer, dairyman, and stock-grower, P.O. Tullytown, was born in Bristol township, Bucks county, August 23, 1842, and is a son of James C. and Elizabeth A. (Headley) King, natives of Bristol township and of English origin. His father was a teacher in early life, and later a farmer. His family consisted of nine children, of whom S.H. was the oldest son. He was reared on the farm, and attended school at Millersville. He chose farming as a business, and at present is the owner of the farm where he resides, near Tullytown. It consists of 110 acres of well-improved land. He was married in 1867 to Elizabeth Ann, daughter of Jonathan Milnor. She was born in Bristol borough, and is of English and German origin. Their children are: William, Milnor, Wesley, Kate, and John. Mr. and Mrs. King are members of the Methodist Episcopal church. In politics he is a republican, and has been school-director in his township.

WILLIAM KINSEY, retired, P.O. Bristol, is a descendant of one of the earliest settlers of this state. The family was early divided into two branches; one engaged in iron-working and the other as workers in leather. Of the former branch were the ancestors of our subject, and several of them were in the revolutionary war. The first to settle in Bristol was Samuel, the son Of a cotton manufacturer of Birmingham, England, who came here in 1728. He was a farmer. His son was the great-grandfather of our subject, and was born in 1755. All of the family since then have been born here. William was born in November, 1804. His early education was limited, but he has been a constant reader. He worked in the cotton mill for a short time, but early in life learned the trade of a blacksmith, which he followed until 1850. Afterward he engaged in iron manufacturing for several years, subsequently dealing in real estate, acting as auctioneer, etc. In 1829 he was married to Mary, daughter of Richard Gastine, whose family have been residents of Bucks county for three generations. Their children were: Mary Anna, Caroline, Elizabeth, Margaret, Fanny and Samuel, deceased, who was a graduate of West Point. Mr. Kinsey has held many public positions. In 1829 he was elected high constable, serving six years; in 1836 chief burgess, holding the position for seven years; and in 1837 school director, serving twenty-four years. In 1842 he was appointed assignee in bankruptcy for the county, and in March, 1845, was appointed postmaster, filling that office for four years. In 1850 he was elected justice of the peace for five years. As assignee, executor, and administrator he has settled about fifty estates. In 1862 he was elected to the state senate for a term of three years, and proved himself an able speaker on the floor, besides serving on the committees of education, agriculture, domestic manufacture, etc. On the call for troops to defend the state invasion, he assisted in raising a company and went into the service, receiving an honorable discharge at the close of his term. He is a frequent contributor to the newspapers and to local history. He is the oldest Freemason in Bristol, and in politics is a democrat.

JESSE W. KNIGHT, retired miller, P.O. Bristol, was born in Philadelphia September 15, 1823, and is a son of Jonathan and Elizabeth (Wilson) Knight, who were natives of this state, of Welsh and English descent. His father, who was a farmer, was in 1832 elected a member of the legislature from Philadelphia county for two years, afterwards made associate judge, and subsequently was justice of the peace. He died in Philadelphia in 1860, his wife dying in 1856. They had ten children, of whom six are living. The oldest son is a prominent farmer near Doylestown, and has been treasurer of Bucks county. Our subject was educated at the academy in Philadelphia, learned the trade of a miller in New Hope, Bucks county, and in 1837 came to Bristol, and in 1841 accepted the position of superintendent of the large mill of John Dorrance. He held this position seven years, when he entered into partnership with Mr. Dorrance, continuing for ten years. He was elected to the state legislature in 1860, and was again elected in 1870 to the state senate for three years. He has also been director of the poor and a member of the town council of Bristol. He has settled several estates to the satisfaction of all concerned. Mr. Knight has been twice married, his first wife being Elizabeth Adair, who died in 1868. They had two children: John D., who is now a manufacturer and dealer in carpets in Philadelphia; and Frank, who is a travelling salesman for David Landreth & Son, seed men. In 1871 Mr. Knight was married to his second wife, who is Sally, daughter of William Fenton, a sea-captain. Mr. Knight is a member of the Society of Friends, a Royal Arch Mason, and a member of the Knights of Pythias. His wife belongs to the Episcopal church.

JOHN H. LA RUE, farmer, P.O. Bristol, was born in Newportville, Bucks county, March 13, 1846, and is a son of George and Christiana (Headly) La Rue. His parents were born in Bucks county, and were of French and English origin. Our subjectís grandfather, Moses La Rue, was a wheelwright and settled in Newportville, in Bristol township, where he carried on his trade. He was justice of the peace for many years and served one term as county treasurer of Bucks county. The father of John H. worked with his father at the wheelwrightís trade for a time and succeeded him in the business, but preferred farming and made that his business. He met with success and is now living a retired life in Bristol. His family consisted of two children, John H. and Mary E. John H. is now living on the home farm, and makes farming his business. He received a good English education at Attleboro and Mount Holly Institute. He is now serving as one of the auditors of Bucks county.

WILLIAM LARZALERE, farmer and stock-grower, P.O. Bristol, was born in Bristol township, January 24, 1809, and is a son of Benjamin and Sarah (Brown) Larzalere, natives of Bucks county. His grandfather, Nicholas Larzalere, was one of the first settlers of this county. The family are descendants of French Huguenots. Benjamin Larzalere was a farmer, and had a family of nine children, of whom William was the youngest. He attended the subscription school in Bucks county, and learned the masonís trade, which he followed until he got a start in the world, when he went to farming and has since followed that with success. He is the owner of a well-improved farm, where he now resides. He was married January 22, 1852, to Anna, daughter of Thomas Antrim. She is of English and Irish origin. Their children are: Benjamin, a farmer; Sallie, the wife of John Tomlinson; and Frederick. Mrs. Larzalere died in 1885. She was a member of the Episcopal church. Mr. Larzalere is a republican, and has served as school-director. His success in life is largely due to his own exertions.

JOSEPH J. LOVETT, farmer, P.O. Emihie, was born July 7, 1836, in the house where he now resides, on the farm in Bristol township. This farm has been in the possession of the family for over two hundred years. The pioneer of the family came over with William Penn in 1682, and Joseph J. is of the sixth generation in descent from this ancestor in Bucks county. He holds the original deed from William Penn. The family were Quakers and usually followed farming. They were of English origin and settled first in Falls township. Our subjectís maternal ancestors were descendants of the Holland Dutch, and also early settlers of Bucks county. Joseph J. was reared here, attending school in Bristol township, and has made farming the business of his life. He was married November 13, 1879, to Fannie, daughter of Joseph and Margaret Ann (Taylor) Janney. Her parents were of Holland and English origin. Mr. and Mrs. Lovett are members of the Society of Friends. In politics he is a republican. Financially he has been successful.

JACOB MCBRIEN, bottler and harness-maker, P.O. Bristol, son of James and Ann (McBrien) McBrien, was born in Ireland, November 12, 1819. His father was a shoemaker and died in Ireland. His mother married again, came with her family to America, and settled in Bristol in 1829. Jacob attended the public schools and early in life was apprenticed to learn the harness-makerís trade. Business being dull, he worked by the day and week until 1842. In that year he embarked in the harness business in Bristol, and has been doing a lucrative business ever since. He also carries on the bottling business successfully. In 1844 he married Mary, daughter of William and Hester (Cleff) Sanderson, both of English origin. Their children are: Sarah, Anna Mary, Jacob, Jr., and Robert. Mr. McBrien is a member of the Masonic order, has been a member of town council and jury commissioner. He is a member of Hopkins Lodge, No. 87, I.O.O.F., and of the twelve charter members he is the only survivor, During the forty-four years he has been connected with the order he has never drawn a sick benefit.

CHARLES MCCORKLE, blacksmith, P.O. Newportville, a native of New York City, was born March 13, 1841, and is a son of Nathan and Catherine (Dodge) McCorkle. His father was born in Bucks county, and his mother in the state of New York. His father was a merchant tailor. His family consisted of seven children, six of whom grew to maturity. Charles was the third child. His parents came to Bucks county in 1844, and settled in Newtown, where Charles received his education, and learned the blacksmithís trade. He first worked at his trade at Hulmeville. He was married in 1867 to Margaretta A., daughter of Randall and Mary (Smith) Curl, natives of Bucks county and of English descent. Their children are: Forest, Mary J., and William K. Mr. and Mrs. McCorkle are members of the Methodist Episcopal church. He has been Sabbath school superintendent for eighteen years. In politics he is a republican, and is a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, Knights of Pythias, and also is a member of the Grand Army Republic. He enlisted in 1861, under Captain Durell, in the battery that was raised with Colonel Davisís regiment. He was in thirteen battles, among which were Antietam, Vicksburg, Fredericksburg, Petersburg, Chancellorsville, and Bull Run. He had many narrow escapes, but was never wounded, being covered by dirt torn up by shells.

JOHN MCGINLEY, farmer, P.O. Bristol, was born in Ireland, August 16, 1828, and is a son of Barney and Barbranna (Colay) McGinley, natives of Ireland. His father was a farmer all his life in Ireland. John was the third in a family of seven children. He attended school both here and in Ireland, having come to America with an uncle, when but 14 years of age. He first obtained work as a drayman in New York City, and subsequently came to Bristol, where he has resided for over forty years. When he came here he was a poor boy, and worked on the river for a time, and then kept a livery-stable. He afterward dealt in real estate, and since 1882 has resided on one of his farms in Bristol township. He is the owner of four farms, and nine houses and lots in Bristol, and lately sold one house and lot for $9,750. Mr. McGinley has made his own way in the world, and at present is worth about $100,000. In 1854 he married Miss Bridget Hewes, daughter of Frank Hewes. She was also born in Ireland. They have had five children: John, a merchant in Bristol; Michael, Mary Ann, James (deceased), and Rebecca. Mr. and Mrs. McGinley are members of the Catholic church. In politics he is a republican.

JAMES E. MAGILL, farmer, P.O. Newportville, was born in Solebury township, April 24, 1844, and is a son of Henry and Ruth (Reece) Magill, natives of Bucks county. Both his paternal and maternal ancestors were early settlers of Pennsylvania, and of English origin. Our subjectís father is a farmer, and now resides in Solebury township. His family consists of ten children, of whom James E. is the oldest. He was reared on a farm, attending the district school, and has made farming his business. He was married in 1855 to Sally, daughter of John and Sarah Ann (Bachman) Jones, and is of English descent. Their children are: Jesse, John, Frank, and Herbert, the last deceased. Mr. Magill is a republican in politics. He has been justice of the peace, supervisor, collector and treasurer of Bristol township. He enlisted in 1862 in company C, 128th Pennsylvania infantry, and held a non-commissioned office. Squire Magill has many friends in Bristol township.

R.J. MILLER, farmer, P.O. Emilie, was born in Philadelphia, November 29, 1851, and is a son of William and Susanna (Shuttlewood) Miller, natives of England. His father was a cabinet-maker by trade, but later followed farming for many years. His family consisted of four children, two of whom are still living. R.J. was the youngest of the family, and was reared in Bucks county, where he received his education. He also attended Andalusia college for a time. He chose farming as his occupation, in which vocation he has been successful, and is now one of the leading farmers in Bristol township. In 1882 he married Kate, daughter of Robert Banford, who is of English descent. They have two children: William R. and Vernon B. (twins); In politics Mr. Miller is a democrat.

RICHARD H. MORRIS, right-of-way agent for the Pennsylvania railroad company, P.O. Bristol, is one of the Morris family whose ancestors came from Wales in 1683, as detailed in the history of the Morris family in Falls township. His father was Richard Morris, a native of Saratoga county, N.Y., who died in Bristol in 1849, aged 54. His mother was Maria Dorrance, a native of Windham county, Conn., who died in 1885, in her 80th year. Richard Morris came to Philadelphia prior to 1830, and in company with David Dorrance built part of the Delaware division of the Pennsylvania canal; part of the Philadelphia and Trenton railroad, and also the Delaware breakwater. Richard H. was his only child, and was born in Philadelphia, January 19, 1840. In 1842 the family removed to Bristol, and when of suitable age young Richard attended the well-known Tennent school, which was built on the site of the old log college founded by Rev. William Tennent, near Hartsville, this county. In 1856 Mr. Morris engaged in mercantile business in New York City, but on the outbreak of the rebellion at once gave up his business, enlisting in April, 1861, as a private in company C, 9th regiment, N.Y.V., the well-known "Hawkins" Zouaves. By successive promotions he was placed in command of company K, and also of a battery. He also did some naval service. He remained in the service until June, 1863, when he returned to New York, engaging again in business there, and also in Philadelphia, and becoming a partner in the firm of Isaac Hough &, Morris, in the West India trade, in connection with which he travelled extensively. In 1875 he abandoned the West India trade and engaged in railroad business, becoming connected in 1882 with the Pennsylvania railroad. He is married to Alice L., daughter of Professor Lardner Van Uxem, state geologist of New York. They have five sons: Richard, now at Lehigh University; Lardner V.; Archibald D.; Armand V.; and Sidney. Mr. Morris is a member of the Loyal Legion of the United States, composed exclusively of commissioned officers of the army or navy who have absolutely clear records. He also organized H. Clay Beatty Post, G.A.R., of Bristol, and was its first commander.

JAMES. PATTERSON, farmer and veterinary surgeon, P.O. Newportville, was born in Bucks county June 19, 1843, being a son of Jesse and Huldah (Morgan) Patterson, natives of Bucks county. They were members of the Society of Friends and of English origin. Jesse Patterson was a farmer. His family consisted of nine children, eight of whom grew to maturity, James being the fourth child. James Patterson remained with his parents until he was 12 years old, after which he worked out and attended school. In 1864 he enlisted in the 5th Pennsylvania cavalry in company H, serving one year. He was severely wounded by a sharp-shooter. The ball passed through his right arm and also through his body, lodging in a book which he had in his coat pocket. The doctor has the ball and the book, which he prizes highly as a relic of the late war, although it came near costing him his life, the ball coming within an inch of his heart. He was wounded at Five Forks or Gravely Run, and was discharged at Washington, D.C., in 1865. After returning home he farmed for five years, then commenced the study of medicine and veterinary surgery at the New Jersey Veterinary school, where he graduated in 1878, and commenced the practice of his profession in Newportville. In 1881 he bought the farm where he now resides and has his office, and has at present an extensive practice. He was married in 1867 to Elizabeth, daughter of Charles R. and Maria (Vanzant) Wright, natives of Bucks county. Mrs. Pattersonís paternal grandparents were Joshua and Beersheba (Rue) Wright, who were of English origin. Her grandfather was a farmer in this county, and had a family of eleven children, of whom Charles Rhodes Wright, her father, was the second. He was a farmer by occupation and, his health failing, he retired from the active duties of life and removed to Bristol, where he died in 1885. The union of Mr. and Mrs. Patterson has been blessed with four children: Lillie B., May W., Charles R., and Alice T. The doctor is a republican. He is a member of the Grand Army of the Republic, and an Odd Fellow, and has been school-director and chairman of the Republican committee of Bristol township.

SYMINGTON PHILLIPS, revenue collector, P.O. Bristol, was born in New York City, April 12, 1819, and is a son of William W. and Frances (Symington) Phillips. His father, of Dutch extraction, was a native of New York, and his mother, who was a native of Canada, was of English descent. His father was pastor of the First Presbyterian church of New York City for over forty years. He had twelve children, of whom ten lived to maturity. Our subject received his education at the University of New York, in which city his business career began, coming to Bristol at the age of 23, where he has since resided. For several years after coming to Pennsylvania he carried on the twine manufactory at New Hope, in this county, and still owns the property. He is now deputy United States revenue collector in Bristol. In 1841 he was married to Margaret, daughter of John Phillips, M.D., of Bristol. Their children are: Frances, wife of George Hamilton, a dry-goods merchant, of New York City; Meta, wife of B. Landreth, of Bristol, one of the proprietors of the great seed farm; Anna J., Sarah C., and Edward S., who is superintendent of the Wilson Ocean Steamship Line in New York. Mr. and Mrs. Phillips are members of the Presbyterian church, of which he has been trustee. He has often served in the town council, has been president of the board, chief burgess, and in 1872 was the choice of his party for congress, but was defeated. In 1879 he was elected to the legislature, and again in 1882 and 1885.

WILLIAM C. PEIRCE, of the firm of Sherman & Peirce, sash, doors, blinds, berry box manufacturers, also lumber yard, P.O. Bristol, was born at that place August 21, 1846, and is a son of Charles W. and Mary (Smith) Peirce; the former was the first representative of his family in Bristol, and the latter was a native of Harford county, Md. William C. was reared in Philadelphia and was educated at the Friendsí Central High school and private schools of that city. He began his business career as a member of the Philadelphia board of brokers, which relation is still sustained. He conducted a brokerage business on Third street in that city for fifteen years. In 1884 he became a member of the firm of Sherman & Peirce and assumed entire charge of the book and sales department. The business of the firm has more than doubled since his connection with it.

WILSON RANDALL, manufacturer of wagons and carriages, P.O. Bristol, was born in Newportville, Bucks county, September 5, 1833. His parents, Eben and Rachel (Vanzant) Randall, were natives of this county and of German descent. His father was a shoemaker and farmer. He was reared on the farm, received a common school education, and learned the wagon-makerís trade, which he has followed ever since, most of the time in business for himself. He was in Newportville two years, and afterward eight years with his brother in Newtown, under the firm name of Wilson & J.V. Randall. The latter still owns and carries on the business at Newtown. Wilson Randall came to Bristol in 1872 and established his present business. He was married to Rachel C., daughter ofí Thomas Harding. Four children have been born to them: Clara, wife of C.F. Brodnax; Clarence and J.M., in business with their father; and Rachel. Mr. Randall is a republican and has served as school-director of the borough.

CALEB P. ROBERTS, farmer, P.O. Newportville, was born in Philadelphia, Pa., tenth month, 1818, and is a son of Evan and Rhoda S. (Pancoast) Roberts. His mother was born in New Jersey, and his father in Philadelphia. They were of English and Welsh origin. His father was a farmer all his life and died in 1862. His family consisted of six children, Caleb P. being the oldest. He was reared on the farm, attended the school at Fallsington, and has made farming his business. He has been successful in life and is now the owner of a farm of 76 acres of land, on which he resides. He was married in 1872 to Margaret G., daughter of Alan and Susanna (Berkheimer) Shoemaker. Her parents were natives of Pennsylvania, and of German and English origin. At the time of her marriage to Caleb P. Roberts she was the widow of Oliver Wilson, by whom she had two children, Alan and Mary T. The marriage of Caleb P. and Margaret J. Roberts has been blessed with one child, Evan. The family are all members of the Society of Friends. Caleb P. Roberts is a republican politically.

S.S. RUE, undertaker, P.O. Bristol, was born in Newportville, May 10, 1828, and is a son of Lewis and Ann (Stackhouse) Rue, natives of Bucks county and of English and French origin. His mother was a member of the Society of Friends. His father was a harness-maker and trimmer by occupation. His family consisted of four sons and two daughters, all now living and in prosperous circumstances. Mr. Rue was reared in this county, attending the school at Newportville. He learned the carpenterís and cabinet-makerís trade, serving five yearsí apprenticeship. In 1850 he came to Bristol and embarked in business with David Swain, and after the death of the latter continued the business himself. In 1852 he was married in Bristol to Elizabeth, daughter of John Martin. She is of Irish and English origin. Their children are: Harvey S., now married and living in Bristol, who was born in 1855, and is now in business with his father; Sarah Ann, wife of Lewis Hall; and Eva, the wife of William Downing. Mrs. Rue died in 1881. Mr. Rue is a member of the Presbyterian church. He is a republican and served six years as a member of the town council of Bristol. He is a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, Knights of Pythias, and the Red Men.

ANDREW SCHAFFER, farmer, P.O. Bristol, was born in Bristol township, December 3, 1827, and is a son of John and Anna (Silba) Schaffer. They were natives of Germany and settled in Bucks county when they first came to America. His father was a cooper and also engaged in farming. Andrew Schaffer is the sixth in a family of ten children, eight of whom grew to maturity. He received his education in the common schools, and when but eight years of age hired out by the year to work. By economy and industry he managed to get a start in the world. At the present time he is the owner of the well-known farm adjoining the corporation of Bristol, known as the Fairview farm. The house is over 100 years old, and is yet a very substantial structure. He was married in 1849 to Catharine, daughter of William and Susannah (Miller) Williams, natives of Monroe county, Pa., and of German and Welsh descent. They have had eight children, six now living: Michael, Susan, wife of James Warden, a merchant in Bristol; Mary, Elizabeth, Priscilla, William, and Anna. Mr. Schaffer is a republican and has been a school-director nine years.

CHARLES E. SCHEIDE, manufacturer of hoop, band and bar iron, P.O. Bristol, was born in the city of Philadelphia, April 18, 1842. He is a son of Samuel and Elizabeth (Morgan) Scheide, the former of German and the latter of English descent. Most of the fatherís life was spent in Philadelphia, and he had six children. Our subject was the oldest of these children, and was reared in Philadelphia, graduating in the high school of that city at the age of sixteen years. He was engaged for a time in journalistic work, on the Philadelphia "Press," and other journals, and subsequently in mercantile pursuits, and was thus employed when he enlisted in the 15th regiment of cavalry as a private in 1862. He served three years, was in several severe battles, including Stone river, and was captain of the company when it was discharged. He was in Warren county, this state, five years, engaged in banking and oil producing. He came to Bristol in 1876, the firm of which he was a member (Neregold, Scheide & Co.) having built the Bristol rolling mill the year previously. Upon the withdrawal of Mr. Neregold in 1886; the "Bristol Rolling Mill Company" was organized, and incorporated December 1, 1886, with Mr. Scheide as president. During the short period of his incumbency the facilities of the mill have been enlarged one-half, the lease of a blast furnace at Hamburg, Berks county, successfully negotiated, and other advantageous conditions rendered operative.

JOSEPH SHERMAN, senior member of the firm of Sherman & Peirce, manufacturers of sash, doors, etc., P.O. Bristol, was born at Spring Lake, N.J., in 1855, and is a son of Benjamin Sherman, who was also a native of that state. His educational opportunities were limited, but he early developed rare mechanical ability. The vicinity of his birthplace is noted as a great fruit-producing region, and the crude methods of marketing its products revealed to the practical mind of Mr. Sherman a wide field for the exercise of his inventive genius. A process for the manufacture of boxes from wooden slats was at length perfected, and in 1875 their manufacture on a large scale was begun at Bristol. Mr. Sherman was sole proprietor of this enterprise until 1884, when the present firm was established. The business has been extended in various directions, and ranks among the most stable industrial features of the town.

JOHN SHERWOOD, deceased, was born in Scotland, June 29, 1806, and was a son of Thomas and Catherine (Bixby) Sherwood, natives of Edinburgh, Scotland. His father was a manufacturer in that country, and reared a family of five children, of whom John was the oldest. He was reared in Scotland, receiving a good education, and also studied medicine two years at the University of Pennsylvania. He devoted some time to the study of botany and commenced the florist business in Philadelphia. He owned a handsome place in Laurel Hill, where he was engaged in this business for several years. He bought a place in Bristol township in 1856, and lived there until his death in 1883. He was engaged for over fifty years in the propagation and introduction into this country of new and rare plants, and was widely known both here and abroad as an authority in all matters pertaining to floriculture. In 1840 he married Annabella, daughter of Joel Shuttlewood, by whom he had three children, only one of whom, Joel W. Sherwood, of Brooklyn, is now living. This wife died in 1847, and lie subsequently married Isabella, daughter of Robert M. and Catharine (Munson) Hartley. Her ancestors were of English origin and eminent people, her father being well known as one of the philanthropists of New York City. His widow and two children still survive him, Robert H., who married in 1875 the daughter of the late Hon. G.W. Palmer, of Luzerne county, and Katherine J., wife of Henry H. Jones, of Philadelphia.

REV. EDWARD P. SHIELDS, D.D., pastor of the First Presbyterian church, of Bristol, was born at New Albany, Ind., August 31, 1833. His grandfather, Patrick Shields, emigrated from the north of Ireland to the colony of Virginia and settled on the Rappahannock. Here he married Mary Nance, a lady of Huguenot descent, and here, in August, 1801, Henry Burnett, the father of Edward P., was born. Not long afterward the family removed to Kentucky, and after a short residence crossed the Ohio river into what is now the state of Indiana. Here Mr. Shields was an active citizen. He held various places of public trust, and was a member of the convention which framed the first constitution of Indiana. Edward P. is the son of Henry B. and Joanna (Day) Shields, the latter a native of Morristown, N.J. On April 19, 1858, he married Sarah Scovel, and they are the parents of six children: Clara (MacConnell), Henry B., Hannah S., Edmund S., William H., and Lillian M. He was educated at Miami University, Oxford, Ohio, and graduated from that institution in June, 1854. He attended the Presbyterian theological seminaries at New Albany, Indiana, and Princeton, New Jersey, graduating from the latter in 1858. On June 2d of that year he was ordained by the Presbytery of West Jersey, and at once entered upon his first pastorate at Pittsgrove, N.J., remaining there until 1870, when he removed to Cape May, his second pastorate, which also continued thirteen years. On March 1, 1884, Mr. Shields became pastor at Bristol and this relation still exists. The degree of D.D. was conferred upon him by his alma mater at the annual commencement, in June, 1887.

JACOB SIMONS, deceased, was born in Philadelphia, September 20, 1821, and was a son of Jacob Simons and of German origin. He received his education in Philadelphia, and engaged as a salesman for a number of years. He also worked at gardening, and in 1866 bought a farm adjoining the corporation of Bristol, and embarked in the business of gardening, which he carried on until his death, which occurred in 1884. He was noted for his honesty and manly dealings. He was a successful gardener and had many friends in Philadelphia and Bristol. In politics he was a republican. He was married in 1854 to Mary, daughter of John and Hannah (Adams) Young. Her parents were Germans. Their children are: Jacob, who is a farmer, John, Henry, William, and Mary. Since the death of their father, the boys have taken charge of the farm and are doing well. The children are all at home.

JOHN R. STACKHOUSE, farmer and stock-grower, P.O. Bristol, was born in Bristol township, September 15, 1820, and is a son of John and Anna (Bowman) Stackhouse. The pioneers of the Stackhouse family were Thomas Stackhouse and two nephews, John and Thomas, who came over with William Penn in 1682. They settled first at Langhorne, in this county. They bought land from Penn and laid out contiguous farms. They were all members of the Society of Friends, but some of their descendants have become Baptists. The father of John R. was a soldier in the revolution, and was at one time overseer of the poor of Bucks county. He was the father of sixteen children, of whom John R. was the youngest. He was reared on the farm, attended school in Emilie, and chose farming as a business, in which he has met with success. In 1853 he married Mary A., daughter of John and Anna (Booz) Subers, who were of German descent. They had seven children: Edward S., Joseph (deceased), Henry, John and William (twins), Thomas, and Anna M. Mr. Stackhouse is a republican and has held most of the township offices. He has served as school-director, and has been justice of the peace since 1879. He is past master of the Masonic fraternity.

WILLIAM M. STACKHOUSE, druggist and insurance agent, P.O. Emilie, was born in Emilie, March 9, 1849, and is a son of Jesse L. and Mary B. (Headley) Stackhouse, who were of English origin. His father was a general insurance agent and also dealt in real estate for many years. His family consisted of three children, of whom William M. is the second. He was reared in Emilie, attending the schools there and also attended Pennsylvania State College, where lie graduated in 1869 with the degree of B.S. He then commenced clerking in a drug-store and soon embarked in business for himself. He very naturally took up the insurance business, having been in his fatherís office as an assistant, and has been thus engaged since. His mother died in 1876, his father following in 1879, and his brother J.H. in 1875. Mr. Stackhouse was married in 1874 to Anna S. Headley, who is of English and Irish descent. Their children are: Charles H. and Jesse T. In politics Mr. Stackhouse is a democrat. He is school-director in the township and is a Royal Arch Mason.

JOHN C. STUCKERT, attorney, P.O. Bristol, was born in Warrington township, this county, and is a son of William Stuckert, under whose name, in that township, is given the history of the family. Our subject was born June 23, 1852, was educated at the Doylestown Seminary, and graduated from Lafayette College in 1875. He studied law in Doylestown, and began practising at Bristol in 1877, where he has since continued. In 1879 he was married to May H. Wright. They have two children, Florence and Marion. Mr. and Mrs. Stuckert are members of the Presbyterian church, of which he is a trustee. In politics he is a democrat.

ANTHONY SWAIN, lawyer, P.O. Bristol, was born October 6, 1815, on the banks of the Neshaminy, opposite Newportville. His father was Samuel Swain, and his great-grandfather Benjamin Swain, who came from England about 1725, owned a tract of land about three miles north of Bristol, on which he built a house of bricks made on the land, as was the custom in early times. He died there in 1793. He had one son, Abraham, who died before him, leaving several children, of whom Samuel was one. Samuel was married in 1810 to Martha, daughter of John and Letitia Briggs, of Newtown township, this county, and some years after purchased and improved the above Newportville farm now belonging to the estate of William Elmslie, where he resided until 1833, when he sold the farm and removed to Bristol. Anthony lived at his fatherís, mostly working on the farm, except in winter, when he attended the neighboring schools. He also attended boarding-schools in Bristol, Burlington, N.J., and Alexandria, Va. He taught school in Bristol and other places until September, 1837, when he commenced the study of law at Doylestown, in the office of Hon. Thomas Ross, the father of George Ross, Esq., the present state senator. He was admitted to the bar in February, 1840, and began practice in Bristol, which he has ever since continued, but since completing his 70th year in 1885 he has withdrawn from active business. On the 26th of October, 1843, he married Abby, daughter of Joseph Warner, of Bristol, to whom he was devotedly attached. She departed this life January 26, 1883. His principles always allied him firmly to the republican party, and though he neither sought nor held public office yet he discharged all duties of citizenship cheerfully and conscientiously, aiding all movements for the benefit of the community in which he lives. He has been president of the Bristol Water company since its inception, also president of the Bristol Gas company, and director of the Farmersí National bank for many years. He and his ancestors, both paternal and maternal, nearly all of whom trace back to settlers contemporary with William Penn, have been consistent members of the Society of Friends and true followers of its doctrines and discipline, and the Bristol meeting has seldom contained a more valued member. He was identified with the anti-slavery cause in his youth and has always been a friend to the colored man. He has also been a warm advocate of the temperance cause, and in all walks of life is regarded as one of Bristolís most respected citizens.

WILLIAM TABRAM, merchant, P.O. Bristol, was born in England in October, 1819, and is a dealer in furniture, stoves and hardware in Bristol borough. His father, J.C. Tabram, was an auctioneer and a dealer in real estate in England, where his whole life was spent. He had five children. Our subject was reared and educated in England. In early life he was apprenticed to a wholesale clothier in London and served seven years. He was employed there till 1843, when he came to this country. He first settled at West Troy, N.Y., and worked on the canal for three years. In 1847 he came to Bristol and, with a few hundred dollarsí capital, began his present business on a small scale. From the start his business steadily increased and he now has several thousand dollars invested. In 1847 he was married to Emma E., daughter of John Glass. She was born in England. Their children are: J. Cleff, a merchant; Elizabeth, John G., a merchant, and Fannie H. Mr. Tabram is a member of the Society of Friends, and in politics a republican. Mrs. Tabram died in 1878. She was a member of the Baptist church.

HON. CALEB NEWBOLD TAYLOR, farmer, P.O. Bristol, Pa., is the seventh child of Anthony Taylor, who in 1802 married Mary, the tenth child of Caleb Newbold, of Springfield township, Burlington county, N.J. He was born at Sunbury farm, on the Neshaminy, in Bristol township, July 27, 1814, and is still living in the same house after a lapse of seventy-three years. He is a lineal descendant of Samuel Taylor, of the parish of Dore, county of Derbyshire, England, who sailed from Bristol, England, in the fly-boat Martha, in the year 1677, and landed where Burlington, N.J., now stands. He was one of the proprietors of West New Jersey and owned one thirty-second of seven undivided nineteenth parts. In the spring of 1678 he located his homestead farm in Chesterfield township, Burlington county, N.J., not far from where the town of Bordentown now stands. It contained about 1500 acres, and it is a remarkable fact that of this land not an acre had passed out of the hands of his lineal descendants for a period of more than two hundred years. To his son Robert he left 500 acres of the tract now known as Brookdale, and from him it came to his son Anthony, an ardent patriot in the revolution, and the grandfather of Caleb N. Anthony Taylor, the son of Anthony, and the father of Caleb, was born at Brookdale farm in the year 1772, and was when quite young placed with John Thompson, an extensive merchant of Philadelphia, to be educated in business. On attaining his majority he formed a partnership with his wifeís brother, Thomas Newbold, and engaged very extensively in the East India trade, under the firm style of Taylor & Newbold. In 1810 he retired from business, and removed permanently to "Sunbury farm," which he had previously purchased for a country seat. He took great interest in agricultural pursuits, and at the time of his death was the largest land-owner in the county of Bucks. Anthony Taylor had eleven children: Robert, Anthony, Sarah, William, Edward Lawrence, Michael, Caleb Newbold, Mary Ann, Thomas, Emma L., and Franklin. The subject of this sketch, Caleb Newbold Taylor, like his father and other ancestors, took great interest in agriculture, and is now the owner of about 3000 acres of improved farm lands in the county. He is a man of great force of character, and acknowledged ability in business affairs, and has also devoted much of his time to political life, and was for many years the acknowledged leader of his party in this county. His political life commenced at the early age of eighteen, when in 1832 he was elected to represent the county of Bucks in the whig convention at Harrisburg. After having repeatedly refused to accept political office, he in 1848 consented to become the nominee of his party for member of congress, the congressional district being then composed of the counties of Lehigh and Bucks, both of which were very largely democratic, and though he was defeated by a small majority, he ran more than a thousand votes ahead of the general ticket. In 1850 he was again the candidate of the whig party, and was again defeated, though still running very largely ahead of the general ticket. in 1852 he was again placed in nomination by the whig party, and was again defeated. In 1866 he was the candidate of the republican party for member of congress and was elected by a handsome majority, Lehigh county not then being in the district, and in 1868 he was re-elected to serve a second term in congress. He has represented Bucks county in nearly every national convention since he became of age. He is president of the Farmersí National bank of Bucks county, at Bristol, of which his father, Anthony Taylor, was president at the time of his death in 1837. Mr. Taylor has left his impress on the business and politics of Bucks county, and by his strict integrity and unswerving devotion t all he considers right, and for the best interests of the people, has won the confidence and esteem of all who know him.

CAPT. ANTHONY TAYLOR, coal-dealer, P.O. Bristol, Pa., is a descendant of the Taylor family whose ancestry is given, under the name of Caleb N. Taylor. On his motherís side he is a descendant of John Jones, who was one of the great landholders in the early days of the colony, having large possessions in Philadelphia and in Bucks county, beside owning many slaves. Anthony Taylor is a grandson of Anthony and Mary Taylor, his father, Robert Taylor, M.D., being a brother of Caleb N. His mother was Elizabeth Ash Jones, and was of the fourth generation in descent from John Jones, named. Anthony Taylor was born in Burlington county, N.J., Oct. 11, 1837, and at an early age went to Philadelphia, where he was educated at the "Protestant Episcopal Academy." He was placed with the firm of John Farnum & Co. to learn business, and remained with them until he reached his majority, it having been understood that he should do so without compensation. Soon after the breaking out of the rebellion, he was residing in Bristol township, Bucks county, the home of his immediate ancestors, and in August, 1862, enlisted as a private in the 15th Pennsylvania cavalry, a regiment enlisted from various counties of the state, all of the members of which were obliged to join as privates, and no commissioned officers were appointed until after the organization of the regiment, except the colonel, lieutenant-colonel, and majors. Having passed through the various grades of non-commissioned officer, he was in the spring of 1863 commissioned as first lieutenant of company A, and took charge of the company as a commissioned officer, having been previously in command as a non-commissioned officer. The company was assigned for courier duty at the headquarters of the army of the Cumberland, Major-General William S. Rosecrans commanding, and acted in that capacity during the campaign from Stone river, which culminated in the battle of Chickamauga, where they did duty carrying despatches on the field. He participated in all the campaigns of the army of the Cumberland, and was present at the battles of Antietam, Stone river, and Chickamauga, and many other, engagements. In the spring of 1865, General William J. Palmer, formerly commanding his regiment, placed him on his staff as aid-de-camp, and he remained with him until the close of the war, having been previously promoted to the rank of captain for services in the field. In February, 1871, he was married to Caroline Fletcher, daughter of Lawrence Johnson (whose ancestors on her motherís side, the Winders, were for many generations of Bucks county), and by whom he has two children, Mary Lawrence Taylor, and Elizabeth Elmslie Taylor. Captain Taylor is a leading coal-dealer in Philadelphia, having an office at No. 201 Walnut place, and is a high-minded and honorable merchant.

JOHN J. WARD, clergyman, P.O. Bristol, is the pastor of the Roman Catholic church in Bristol, of which faith were his parents, John and Mary (Campbell) Ward, natives of Ireland, who came to this country shortly after their marriage. Our subject was the youngest but one of a family of eight, and was born January 1, 1847. He was educated in church schools, and ordained a priest April 3, 1871. His first appointment was as assistant at St. Peterís church, Reading, Pa. From there he was transferred to Philadelphia, serving for eight years at various churches, among others at the Cathedral, where he spent the better part of two years. On the death of the Rev. P.A. Lynch, of St. Markís church, Bristol, Father Ward was appointed his successor by the late Archbishop Wood, assuming charge of the parish May 3, 1879. His pastoral care at that time embraced Bristol, and two outside missions, Newtown and Yardleyville, each eleven miles distant. During the summer of 1880 these missions were formed into a separate parish, with a resident pastor at Newtown. His present congregation is growing rapidly and now numbers about fifteen hundred souls. Father Ward is regarded as a very energetic worker. Soon after his advent to Bristol he took up the unfinished work of his laborious predecessor, beautified the interior of the church, erected a handsome and sweet-toned pipe organ at a cost of $1200, and made many other much-needed improvements at a total expenditure of about $5000. Scarcely, however, were these things accomplished when an accidental fire destroyed most of the church interior. Sustained by the sympathy of the entire Bristol community and that of many outside friends, he again went to work with renewed energy, and has now unquestionably the handsomest church in Bucks county. It is finely finished, having large, commodious pews, frescoed walls and ceiling, beautiful altars, and a first class pipe-organ. Recognizing the great advantages of a parish school, Father Ward in 1884 purchased a most admirable site for this purpose on Radcliffe street, facing the river, on which the school building and sistersí convent are now being erected. The building from present appearances will be an ornament to the town; it is much admired by all who see it. Besides the devoted attachment of his own congregation Father Ward rejoices in the respect and esteem of the entire Bristol community.

JAMES WARDEN, merchant, P.O. Bristol, was born in Philadelphia, January 12, 1848. His parents, William and Martha (Linch) Warden, were natives of Ireland and of Scotch origin. William Warden came to America when a young man, and is still living at the advanced age of 73 years. He was for over forty years superintendent of the great Landreth seed farm in Bristol township. He had five children, three of whom are now living. James, the third child, attended school in Bristol and learned the carpenterís trade, which he followed until 1875. In 1877 he embarked in his present business, which he has successfully continued ever since. He was married in 1877 to Susan W., daughter of Andrew Shaffer. She was born in Bristol. Their children are: Kate and Mattie. Mr. and Mrs. Warden are members of the Presbyterian church in Bristol, of which he has been trustee. He is a republican, and has served as a member of the town council. He is an Odd Fellow and a Knight of Pythias.

WILLIS P. WEAVER, physician, P.O. Bristol, was born in Lockport, Niagara county, N.Y., August 2, 1853. He was the third in a family of seven children, six of whom grew to maturity. His parents were Darius S. and Miranda (Barnes) Weaver, the former a native of New York, and the latter of Connecticut. Our subject attended the Union academy in Lockport and business college in New York. When 18 years old he began teaching and taught school six winters. After deciding to adopt the profession of medicine, he entered the Hahnemann medical college in Philadelphia, and was graduated in 1883. The same year he opened an office in Bristol, where he has a large and increasing practice. His wifeís maiden name was Adelaide Comstock. She was born in Niagara county, N.Y. Her father, Artemas Washington Comstock, was a prominent citizen of Niagara county, and served in the New York state assembly. Dr. Weaver has two children, Florence and Mildred. He is a member of the Homoeopathic medical society and secretary of the Hahnemann medical college alumni, class of 1883. In politics he is a republican. Both he and Mrs. Weaver are members of the Presbyterian church.

CORNWELL WOOLSTON, farmer and stock-grower, P.O. Emilie, was born on the farm on which he now resides February 15, 1855, and is a son of William and Elizabeth S. (Minster) Woolston, natives of Bucks county and of English origin. His father was a successful farmer and died in 1877, leaving two children. Cornwell was the oldest and was reared on the farm, attending the common schools and the public school in Philadelphia. He is a farmer and stock-grower and has been successful in these vocations. He is the owner of the Prospect farm, consisting of one hundred acres of land, which he is constantly improving. The land was bought nearly one hundred years ago by his grandfather, Benjamin Woolston, who obtained it at that early date for less than $30 per acre. It is now worth $150 per acre. Mr. Woolston raises a fine grade of sheep and also keeps good stock. In 1877 he married Rhoetta, daughter of Mahlon and Esther A. (Porter) Harding. Her mother is a native of Maryland and her father of Bucks county, and of English origin: Mr. and Mrs. Woolston have four children: William Lawrence, Elizabeth J., Bertha, and Stella R. Mr. Woolston is a republican and a member of A.Y.M.

J. WESLEY WRIGHT, merchant, P.O. Bristol, was born in Bristol May 29, 1843, and is a son of John and Rebecca (Bloomsburg) Wright, natives of Bucks county. His father was a merchant of Bristol and had five sons, three now living. They are all prosperous merchants in Bristol. J. Wesley is the oldest. He was reared in Bristol, attending the public schools, and early in life clerked in his fatherís store. He was admitted to a partnership with his father in 1865, and continued the business for three years after which his father retired from it, and since then he has conducted it alone. His father built the present store building in 1857. In 1864 Mr. Wright married Lucy, a daughter of Joseph Tomlinson, of Bristol. They have one child, William S., who is studying law. Mr. and Mrs. Wright are members of the Methodist Episcopal church, of which he is a trustee and treasurer and a teacher of the Bible class in the Sabbath school. During the late war he served in the Union army as an emergency man. He served twenty-one years as a member of the council of Bristol, and during that time served four years as chief burgess. He is a republican and a member of the Grand Army of the Republic.

 

 
     
     
     
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